The generation gap is a thing, and it might be causing problems in your home – especially if you have a young adult child. If you’re a parent, you’ve probably been accused of “not understanding” at least a few times by now. And, depending on the situation, that might be true. It’s especially difficult to help your child choose a career when you don’t understand the things that are influencing their experience. However, try to think back on your own journey to find a career. The things that influenced your decision-making process are probably different from the things affecting your child’s experience. Keep that in mind and it might help you bridge the gap between you and your child.

Children today grow up in a very different world then we did. Technology has changed nearly everything, from how we socialize to how we work. And as a result, most kids will enter the workforce as adults with a different skillset and mentality than we were given. So how does that affect their career journey?

Your child’s career path will likely differ from yours in many ways. Some of these differences are due to factors outside of your control, while others are related to your child’s personality and interests. Knowing how to support your child’s unique career development will help you both grow professionally and personally.

Understand what motivates them.
There are three main reasons why children pursue certain careers: 1) They enjoy the work; 2) They need money; 3) They want to make a difference. Understanding each of these motivations will help you better understand your child’s career choices.

Help them find their passion.
Children who love what they do tend to stay with it longer than those who don’t. If you want your child to choose a career path that he or she loves, encourage them to explore their interests and passions. This will give them a sense of purpose and direction.

Encourage them to take risks.
You can also encourage your children to take risks by helping them understand how taking risks can lead to success. For example, when my son was younger, I encouraged him to try new things. He loved playing soccer, so I would let him play even though he wasn’t very good at it. I wanted him to learn how to work hard and practice his skills. In addition, I told him that if he worked really hard, he might one day make the team. That gave him confidence and helped him believe that he could achieve anything.

Be supportive.
If you want your child to succeed, you need to support him or her. This means being there for your child emotionally as well as physically. It also means encouraging your child to do what he or she wants to do. Don’t tell your child what to do; instead, ask questions and listen carefully.

Don’t compare them to others.
You should never compare your child with other children because each child has his or her own strengths and weaknesses. Instead, focus on helping your child develop his or her unique talents.

Help Your Child Achieve Career Clarity